Influential Dramatists and Ideas about Role of Theater

Throughout the history of theater, certain dramatists have been particularly influential in shaping new ideas about the role of the theater and its methods. These dramatists have often challenged traditional notions of what theater is and can be, and have pushed the boundaries of what is possible on the stage.

One example of a dramatist who has had a significant impact on the role of the theater is Bertolt Brecht. According to Fraser, G.S. in "The Modern Writer and His World," Brecht was a German playwright who was active during the 1920s and 1930s, and is known for his innovative approach to theater known as the "epic theater." Brecht's epic theater sought to challenge traditional notions of theater as a purely entertainment medium, and instead argued that theater should be used to engage audiences in a critical dialogue about social and political issues. White, John J. in "Bertolt Brecht’s Dramatic Theory" also notes that Brecht's plays often featured characters who were meant to represent different ideological positions, and used techniques such as alienation and verfremdungseffekt (estrangement effect) to encourage audience members to think critically about the issues being presented on stage.

Another example of a dramatist who has had a significant impact on the role of the theater is August Wilson. Wilson is an American playwright who is known for his cycle of ten plays that explore the African American experience in the 20th century. Fraser notes that Wilson's plays are notable for their focus on the African American community and the ways in which it has been shaped by social, political, and economic forces. His plays often explore themes of race, identity, and community, and seek to engage audiences in a deeper understanding of the African American experience.

Overall, these dramatists and others like them have had a significant impact on the way that we think about the role of the theater and its methods. Their works have challenged traditional notions of what theater is and can be, and have helped to shape new ideas about the role that the theater can play in society. They have encouraged audiences to think critically about the issues being presented on stage, and have helped to foster a greater understanding and appreciation of the complexity of social and political issues.


References

White, John J. Bertolt Brecht’s Dramatic Theory. Camden House. 
2004

Fraser, G.S. The Modern Writer and His World. Rupa and Co. 
Calcutta, 1961.

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